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Archive for the ‘ornament’ Category


Finally it is up! Still a work in progress, I’m trying to get the tree skirt done before Christmas!!

I will be working on a tree topper over the next year!
(I’m thinking angel, but we’ll see where inspiration takes me!)
If you look closely you can see some of the felt ornaments.

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[from Better Homes and Gardens]

The light will dance on these wintertime snowflakes, made from a variety of crystal-like beads.

What You Need:

For each snowflake:

Enlarge Image

It’s easy to make a blizzard’s worth
of these sparkling snowflakes.

  • 10 corsage pins with pearl ends (available in fabric and craft stores)
  • Crystal-like beads in desired shapes and sizes
  • 1 small cork
  • Iridescent white glitter paint pen (usually used for fabric, available in craft and discount stores)
  • Monofilament thread
Instructions:

1. Add beads to 4 pins. Place beads on 1 corsage pin in desired order, leaving the last 1/4 inch without beads. Make 3 more beaded pins using the same arrangement.

2. Make another set of 4 beaded pins, using a different arrangement. Make an additional set of 2 beaded pins. (You should have a total of 10 beaded pins.)

3. Add 4 matching pins to cork. Cut the cork, if necessary, so it is about 1/4 inch long. With the round side of the cork laying on the work surface, poke one beaded pin into the cork (close to work surface) like a spoke of a wheel. Place a matching beaded pin opposite the first. Place the remaining two opposite each other, between the first set.

4. Add remaining pins. Using the remaining set of 4 matching pins, poke each into the cork, slightly closer to the top of the cork and alternating with the first set of four. Place the remaining 2 beaded pins into each round end of the cork.

5. Cover the cork using glitter paint pen. Allow to dry. Apply a second coat, if necessary, and let dry.

6. To hang, cut a desired length of monofilament and tie to one spoke of the snowflake.

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Jazz up the classic snowflake in an unexpected way using jingle bells.

What You Need
  • 16-gauge crafts wire
  • Needle-nose pliers
  • Fine crafts wire
  • Glue gun and hotmelt adhesive
  • Assorted 9-mm- to 1-inch-diameter jingle bells
How to Make It

1. Cut three 6- to 8-inch lengths of 16-gauge crafts wire.

2. Using needle-nose pliers, bend one of the wires to make a hook for hanging.

3. Cross the wire pieces in the center, wrap with fine crafts wire to secure in a spoke shape, and reinforce the wire with hot glue.

4. Hot-glue one bell over the center intersection of the wire assembly.

5. Slide bells onto each wire spoke, securing them on the back side with hot glue.

6. Trim the remaining wires.

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Here is my latest project. The method is very similar to my felt elf but obviously I dress it in a ballerina’s tutu.

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^Okay if you remember, this was the inspiration^

Here are images of my elf ornament in progress.
[I’ll try to edit this with directions when I’m finished. Hopefully I’ll be able to make some patterns!]

What you need:

round wood bead [I used 25mm]

Flesh toned acrylic paint [I used Delta Ceramcoat  ‘santa’s flesh’]

paint brush

black art pen [for drawing face]

2 pieces of chenille pipe cleaner [beige or flesh tone would be best]

Your choice of felt colors [I used scraps of lime, red and green]

clear tacky glue

needle and thread [coordinate your thread with felt colors]

pom poms, jingle bells or other accoutrement

Gold cord for hanging



Here’s the finished elf, A little rough but I think he came out pretty cute! Still working on how to do patterns and directions!!

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I won’t do this too often,

but here are the newest additions to my etsy Christmas shop:bzlittlechristmaself

$1 of every puzzle wreath ornament sold will be donated to The Autism Research Institute.
[ARI was established in 1967. ARI is primarily devoted to conducting research, and to disseminating the results of research, on the triggers of autism and on methods of diagnosing and treating autism. They provide research-based information to parents and professionals around the world. ARI is the hub of a worldwide network of parents and professionals concerned with autism. The ARI data bank, the world’s largest, contains over 40,000 detailed case histories of autistic children from over 60 countries.]

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